Rachel's Update 4-13-2020

posted Apr 13, 2020, 12:39 PM by Cynthia Friedman
Good morning families!  

Welcome to week 3 of supplemental learning/online school.  We will be moving to the Seesaw online school program/platform soon.  However, we are rolling out one class at a time to make this a smoother transition for all involved.  Please be patient as we work on streamlining this process.  I am excited to make use of this new way to come together as a classroom and interact more fluidly with students and families.

Please reach out if you have any questions or are in need of help.  I will do what I can to be of assistance during this challenging time.  My office hour is 11 - 12.  I also check emails throughout the day.  The following weekly schedule is a suggested daily plan.  Please feel free to alter it as needed.  Remember that time spent with family is so valuable.  You are all doing an amazing job!

**Please see the attached .pdf for a complete list of resources for this week's activities.

--

Ridgeline Public Charter Montessori – Lower El

 

Week 3 Distance Learning Schedule

 

Rachel and Jacob’s Classroom

 

This week we are diving into Japan studies!  Our Language Arts and Cultural curriculum are combined this week to reflect the nature of the activities presented.  Learning about how other people live helps us to see the beauty in differences.  When you look deep enough, you can see yourself reflected back at you.  Earlier this year we studied the fundamental needs of humans.  They are: food, shelter, clothing, protection/defense, transportation, and spiritual (religion, art, self-expression).  In this study we learned that every culture has certain needs that they find a way to meet.  What do you remember about the fundamental needs?  What similarities and differences can you find between Japanese culture and the culture that you are a part of?  What does that tell you about people?  What does that tell you about yourself?

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

9:30 Zoom meeting

Prepare your workspace

9:30 Zoom meeting

Prepare your workspace

9:30 Zoom meeting

Prepare your workspace

9:30 Zoom meeting

Prepare your workspace

9:30 Zoom meeting

Prepare your workspace

Language Arts/Cultural:

 

Read for at least 20 minutes

 

Choose one activity from the unit on Japan: Life in Japan, Haiku, Japanese Games, Origami, Music, and Geography.

Language Arts/Cultural:

 

Read for at least 20 minutes

 

Choose one activity from the unit on Japan: Life in Japan, Haiku, Japanese Games, Origami, Music, and Geography.

Language Arts/Cultural:

 

Read for at least 20 minutes

 

Choose one activity from the unit on Japan: Life in Japan, Haiku, Japanese Games, Origami, Music, and Geography.

Language Arts/Cultural:

 

Read for at least 20 minutes

 

Choose one activity from the unit on Japan: Life in Japan, Haiku, Japanese Games, Origami, Music, and Geography.

Language Arts/Cultural:

 

Read for at least 20 minutes

 

Choose one activity from the unit on Japan: Life in Japan, Haiku, Japanese Games, Origami, Music, and Geography.

Math:

 

Level 1:  Find a bag of food with a nutrition label.  How many calories are in each serving?  Compare that to the nutrition label on another bag of food.  Which one has the most calories?

Bonus: Graph 5 different foods by calories per serving.

 

Level 2: Find a bag of food with a nutrition label.  How many calories are in each serving?  How many servings are in the bag?  Multiply the calories by how many servings to find the total calories for the entire bag.

Bonus: Compare 5 different nutrition labels.  Create a bar graph showing the calories per serving or the total calories.  Which food has the most calories?  Which food has the least calories?

Math:

 

Level 1:  The answer to an addition or subtraction problem is 32.  List as many solutions as you can.  Bonus: Create a word problem with the answer 32.

 

Level 2: The answer to a multiplication problem is 18.  List as many solutions as you can.


Bonus: Create a multiplication word problem with the answer 18.  Now try this challenge with a new number.

 

Math:

 

Create a menu based on food that you have at your house.  Include prices.

Bonus: Plan a meal based on the food you have available.  With a parent, cook and serve your meal to your family!

 

Math:

 

Create a poll (see a sample poll and tally chart below).  Write down several questions with yes/no answers.  Ask your family your questions and document their answers on a tally chart.
Bonus: For each question answer the following: What fraction represents no answers?  What fraction represents yes answers?

 

Math:

 

How many jumping jacks can you do in a minute?  How many sit ups?  Take those two numbers and create and illustrate a word problem.  Share your word problem with your family!

Bonus:  Family challenge!  How many jumping jacks and sit ups can your family do?  Document their results on a graph.

 

 

Clean up your workspace

Clean up your workspace

Clean up your workspace

Clean up your workspace

Clean up your workspace

 


 

My Poll:

 

1.         Do you like to eat carrots?  YES   NO

 

2.         Do you like to eat peas?  YES   NO

 

3.         Do you like to eat apples?  YES   NO

 

4.         Do you like to eat marshmallows?  YES   NO

 

5.         Do you like to eat tomatoes?  YES   NO

 

Tally Chart

Question

Tally of Yes Answers

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Story prompt #1

Story prompt #2


story_prompt_01.png


story_prompt_02.png

mad_lib_01.png


 

Life in Japan

If you lived in Japan, how would life be different for you? Here are some resources to help you begin to understand what life is like for those who live in Japan. Choose a video from this list and write a report on the video you watched.

 

Assignment:

Write about what is similar to your life here in America, and write about what things are different. What did you think strange or new about what you saw? What do you think you would like or dislike about living in Japan?

 

Elementary School Life in Japan - The School Day

 

The next three videos were taken from the youtube channel “Life Where I’m from”. This channel has many other videos that talk about life in Japan, as well as some other related topics. If you’d like, several of the other videos on the channel could be used for this activity as well.

What Japanese Breakfast is Like

The Homework of a Japanese Student in Third Grade

Elementary School Rules in Japan (Subtitles Available)

 

Haiku

Haiku (俳句) is a type of short poem that has been practiced for hundreds of years. When we write haiku in English, we count the syllables of each word that we use to make sure that our haiku is the right length. If you aren’t sure how many syllables are in a word, this video might help you.

 

Syllables

 

To write a Haiku

Use three lines with syllables

write five, seven, five

 

The first and last lines of a haiku have five total syllables. The second line is the longest, and has seven total syllables. I think you will find that writing haiku is not too difficult. Here are two templates to help get you started.

 

Assignment:

Try writing your own haiku poem and read it to your family.

 

Haiku Starter

Haiku Pattern Template

Once you feel ready, take a look at this translation of a famous haiku written by Natsume Souseki.

 

Over the wintry

Forest, winds howl in rage

With no leaves to blow.

 

In Japan, haiku is always written using words that tell the reader about the season, These words are called “kigo” (季語). Haiku are usually written about nature, and kigo help the writer express the feelings that come with the season that they describe. The kigo used in Natsume’s haiku are “wintry forest”. 

 

Bonus:

Try writing your own traditional haiku about something in nature. Make sure to use words that help the reader know what season your haiku is set in.

 

Japanese Games

Shiritori

Shiritori is a word game that is especially popular with children and high schoolers in Japan. In order to play, you need to find at least 1 other person to play with. The first person will take a turn and say a word out loud. The next person will have to say a word that begins with the last letter of the word that the previous person said. For example:

 

Player 1 says: “Friend” 

 

Player 2 says: “Drive

 

Player 3 says: “Evil” 

 

The game ends when someone says a word that has already been used, or takes too long to think of a word. You can make it more challenging by choosing a category like “animals” that every word has to be a part of.

 

Here is a video that describes how to play the game using writing materials.

ESL Games For Reading & Phonics | Shiritori Explanation | Easy ESL Games

 

Assignment:

Play a game of shiritori with someone you know. You could even do this online over text or zoom if the person you want to play with isn’t nearby.



Karuta

Karuta – A Japanese Card Game

 

Karuta can be a simple or complex game depending on how you choose to play it. In order to play you need a set of reader cards and a set of player cards. A player card (left) and its corresponding reader card (right) might look like this:

 

O

Outside my window

The birds sing through the morning

Warm sunlight returns

Two players sit across from each other with the player cards spread face up across the floor between them. A third person holds the reader deck, and reads through them in order after shuffling. In my example, once the reader says “Outside”, the players know which card they are supposed to find. Whoever can find and grab it from the ground first claims that card. Both players keep playing until all of the cards are picked up and then count how many they were able to pick up during the game. Whoever ends up with the most cards wins.

 

Here is a resource that supplies cards that can be printed out if you are interested.

Rules for Karuta

 

Assignment:

Summarize how to play the game Karuta in your own words.

 

Bonus:  

Print or create your own set of cards and play Karuta with your family!

 

Origami

In Japan, origami (折り紙) is the art of paper folding. The practice of folding paper into art has been a part of many cultures throughout history. In Edo period Japan, origami could be found attached to gifts and functioned like greeting cards. The activity quickly became a popular form of entertainment, and is now enjoyed around the world. 

 

When doing origami, it is best to start with a square sheet of paper of any size. Once you have chosen your paper, you should not cut into it with scissors or use tape or glue to hold it in shape.

 

Here are 42 simple instruction sets to help you get started.

Easy Origami Instructions and Diagrams

 

Assignment:

Try a few! Practice makes perfect.

 

Once you feel like you’re ready to move on, here is a video that talks about the cultural significance and philosophy behind origami in Japan. 

One Thousand Cranes

 

In Japan, cranes are a symbol of good luck and long life. Some people believe that if you fold 1000 paper cranes, you may be granted a wish. Sometimes strings of 1000 paper cranes called senbazuru (千羽鶴) will be given to friends or family who are sick to show them that they are loved and cared for. 

paper_cranes.png

 

Bonus:

Follow these directions to learn how to make a paper crane. You can make more than one if you want to!

How To Make a Paper Crane: Origami Step by Step-Easy

 

Music

I have tried to include a variety of styles of music in this list. Try listening to a few and think about how they make you feel. Although you won’t be able to understand the words, you may find that music can still be enjoyed even if you don’t know the language.

 

Assignment:

After you are done listening, write about your thoughts. What did you think was interesting or surprising? What kind of situation do you think this music would be good for? Did you enjoy what you heard?

 

Kousuke Atari - Sorezoreni

Yamabushi (Noh music set to Shugendo imagery)

Kodo - "O-Daiko" - HD (japanese drummers - Taiko - tambours géants Japon)

さくら(Sakura) 25絃箏 (25 strings koto)

Shamisen Girls Ki&Ki - Tsugaru Jongara Bushi

Official髭男dism - PretenderOfficial Video

SUPER BEAVER「らしさ」MV

あいみょん - マリーゴールド【OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO

愛にできることはまだあるかい RADWIMPS MV

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pjTbu05sIrY

おさかな天国〈振り付き〉

Hatsune Miku World is Mine / ryosupercell)【初音ミク】

Joe Hisaishi - One Summer's Day

 

Geography

Here is a blank map of Japan. 

 

Blank Map of Japan

 

Option 1:

1. Print out the blank map of Japan.  Find and label as many of these locations as you can: Sea of Japan, East China Sea, Pacific Ocean, Hokkaido Island, Honshu Island, Shikoku Island, Kyushu Island, Tokyo, Osaka, Kyoto, Kobe, Hiroshima, Kumamoto, Sapporo, Sendai.

 

2. Color the map however you like.

 

Option 2:

1. Choose a topic related to Japan that you are interested in. Put together a research project using drawings and facts that you learn about your topic. If you aren’t sure what you want to research, try choosing one of the locations listed in option 1.

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